US Greenhouse Gas Emissions 2008

US Greenhous Gas Emissions 2008 (US DOE EIA)

In advance of the upcoming Copenhagen conference on global warming, the US Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration has released a 68-page report on Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008. With detailed sections on carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and such “high-GWP” gases as hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride, as well as a concluding section on land use, the report contributes significantly to an understanding of the US economy’s contributions to greenhouse gases and global warming.

Observing that “total US greenhouse gas emissions in 2008 were 2.2 percent below the 2007 total,” the EIA ascribes this reduction to “three factors: higher energy prices — especially during the summer driving season — that led to a drop in petroleum consumption; economic contraction in three out of four quarters of the year that resulted in lower energy demand for the year as a whole in all sectors except the commercial sector; and lower demand for electricity along with lower carbon intensity of electricity supply.”

Filled with interesting and illuminating details, this report is an excellent resource for anyone interested in the fundamental state of American greenhouse gas emissions, their sources and the prospects for their reduction.

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Published in: on December 4, 2009 at 12:56 pm  Comments (1)  

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  1. […] much more on this topic see our earlier post US Greenhouse Gas Emissions 2008. Published […]


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