The Battle of New Orleans, Intermission

A little more flippantly, there’s this performance by Johnny Horton, and a reprise by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

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Published in: on March 14, 2009 at 11:51 am  Comments (1)  

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  1. Please observe the young color-bearer holding the American flag portrayed in the painting, “The Battle of New Orleans.”
    https://haysvillelibrary.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/battle-of-new-orleans.jpg?w=470&h=319

    My Great (x3) Grandfather was George Campbell Hays, husband of Sarah Dillard Collins. He was a young color-bearer in the Battle of New Orleans, as you will note in the following excerpt from Genealogy of the descendants of John Walker of Wigton, Scotland … (Page 502)
    http://www.archive.org/stream/genealogyofdesce00inwhit#page/502/mode/2up.

    “GEORGE CAMPBELL Hays, Sr., m. Dec. 28, 1824, near Winchester, Clark County, Ky., to Sarah Dillard Collins (daughter of Dillard Collins and Sarah Montague Duncan, who was descended from Peter Montague of Virginia) ; both members of the Christian Church.

    George Campbell Hays was apprenticed at an early age to Mr. Bell, a merchant of Adair County, Ky. At the age of eighteen he enlisted in the War of 1812, against Great Britain, and served as color-bearer in a regiment of Kentucky Volunteers, conmianded by Colonel Adair, under General Jackson. He was at the Battle of New Orleans, and during the hottest of the fighting the flag was shot away and fell without the breastworks of cotton bales. Young Hays climbed over the breastworks and regained the flag, and stood for some time holding it aloft by its shattered standard ; although the enemy’s fire was directed at him he came out unscathed.

    After the war he returned to Columbia, Ky., where he remained until his marriage. He then removed to Overton, Monroe County, Tennessee, where he engaged in the general merchandise business, in which he was very successful, accumulating what was then considered quite a fortune. He removed to Ralls County, Mo., in 1835, journeying overland with his wife, three children and servants.”


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