2009 Calendar

One of several variants of the Aztec calendar

One of several variants of the Aztec calendar

Speaking of your photographs, this coming Tuesday December 23rd the Haysville Community Library will welcome all members of the community to the Annual Holiday Open House celebration (more about this in a later post) at which the Friends of the Library will be offering a 2009 Haysville Calendar, illustrated exclusively with photographs of Haysville taken by citizens of Haysville. It’s a wonderful opportunity to support your library and enjoy the pleasures of Haysville scenes throughout the coming year.

(Oh, and for more information on the Aztec calendar, see Rene Voorburg’s Aztec Calendar.)

Published in: on December 17, 2008 at 4:23 pm  Leave a Comment  

Your Shot

Abandoned railroad tracks near the former site of the Berlin wall, in Berlin's Zehlendorf district.

Abandoned railroad tracks near the former site of the Berlin wall, in Berlin's Zehlendorf district.

Have a treasured photo that you think might capture the interest and attention of others? Consider submitting it to the National Geographic. Every month, beginning on the 15th day of the month, the magazine is accepting up to 5,000 submissions (one per person only) for posting on the National Geographic website in their Daily Dozen display – and for possible publication in an upcoming issue of National Geographic.

For all the details, and more, see National Geographic’s Your Shot. How to enter? See the photo submission rules here.

Published in: on December 17, 2008 at 4:04 pm  Leave a Comment  

Risk of Death: Natural Hazard Mortality Map

lightning

Using nationwide data collected since 1970, two University of South Carolina researchers have created a map of natural hazard mortality in the United States for publication in the open access International Journal of Health Geographics.

The map represents the likelihood of dying as a result of such natural events as floods, earthquakes and weather extremes, at the county level, throughout the United States. Other useful graphic displays summarize the basic information in the study by region and by cause of death.

The single greatest natural hazard causing death is heat or drought (19.6% of deaths), closely followed by severe weather (18.8%) and winter weather (18.1%), then flooding (14%), tornadoes (11.6%) and lightning (11.3%). Hurricanes and tropical storms, despite widespread perceptions, contribute to less than 2% of deaths.

A preliminary version of the document, complete with interesting graphic displays of the basic information and a reduced map of the results, can be found here in provisional form, and should soon be available in its final publication version at the International Journal of Health Geographics. For a quick abstract summarizing its contents, look here. For a somewhat more expanded brief on the basics of the study, see Science Daily’s report United States Death Map Revealed.

For further interesting information and resources on disaster deaths, see Ilan Kelman’s website item Disaster Death.

Published in: on December 17, 2008 at 2:01 pm  Comments (1)  
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